Dr. Sheri Weinstein Welcomes You

Dr. Sheri Weinstein’s medical practice is based on internal and functional medicine, as well as anti aging and regenerative medicine. She uses advanced diagnostic techniques  to unveil toxicities, nutritional and mitochondrial deficiencies and hormone imbalances, all of which can hasten the aging process and contribute to a variety of disease processes including obesity, the number one health problem in America today. Sarasota Wellness and Internal Medicine facility provides many screening services for detecting cardiovascular disease, including a complete human performance lab with V02 testing, stress testing, and vascular and cardiac dopplers.

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New Rules for Mammograms, Other Tests

How many times in your adult life have you had this bizarre dream? You dream you have overslept, and realize that you have missed your final exam in a key college course. Of course, you’ve been out of college for 10, 20 years or longer, so the dream makes no sense. According to PsychologyToday.com, many people have this very same dream, waking up in a cold sweat because they missed their final Biology or Accounting exam. Now, for a dose of reality: How many times have you had a bad dream that, as a mature adult, you missed a big physical exam, say a colonoscopy, or a mammogram? Unfortunately, too many people ignore the importance of these vital tests in promoting good health. To make matters worse, the guidelines for some of these tests have changed in recent years, and there is confusing and contradictory information circulating about how often these vital tests are needed. Here are three critical health tests for adults.

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Early Diagnosis Key in Treating Dementia

Every 67 seconds on average, someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s Disease. That depressing statistic comes courtesy of the Alzheimer’s Association, which has plenty of other alarming stats on hand. More than 5 million Americans are living with this dread neurological disease, and roughly 500,000 people die every year from Alzheimer’s. That makes it the sixth leading cause of death in the U.S.

Yet while several hundred thousand new cases of dementia are diagnosed each year, not all cases are due to Alzheimer’s. Many other types of dementia are due to microvascular disease or toxins being deposited in the brain. Early diagnosis is critical in improving the efficacy of treatment of these neurodegenerative disorders. Despite the bold claims of some pharmaceutical companies with Alzheimer’s drugs on the market, once you have any kind of dementia, it’s really not treatable. There’s a vast amount of work being done in Alzheimer’s and dementia research, and the search is on to find better, more reliable predictors for the onset of Alzheimer’s.

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Are You a Heavy Drinker? The Answer Might Surprise You

 

Does this sound like you? Once or twice a week you finish work and head to a local bar to meet friends for dinner and two or three drinks. Other nights you just go home and have a couple of cocktails before dinner. Nothing wrong with two or three drinks every day after work, right?

Many people are rethinking that mindset, following the recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report on the dangers of excessive alcohol use. According to the CDC’s definition, heavy drinking is defined as 15 or more drinks a week for men, and eight or more drinks a week for women In essence, that’s about two drinks per day for men, and

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Obesity & Inactivity Cause Cancer Deaths

Report to the nation finds continuing declines in cancer death rates since the early 1990s;
Feature highlights cancers associated with excess weight and lack of sufficient physical activity

Death rates from all cancers combined for men, women, and children continued to decline in the United States between 2004 and 2008, according to the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2008. The overall rate of new cancer diagnoses, also known as incidence, among men decreased by an average of 0.6 percent per year between 2004 and 2008. Overall cancer incidence rates among women declined 0.5 percent per year from 1998 through 2006 with rates leveling off from 2006 through 2008.

The report is co-authored by researchers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, the National Cancer Institute, and the American Cancer Society. It appeared early online on March 28, 2012, in the journal CANCER.

The special feature section highlights the effects of excess weight and lack of physical activity on cancer risk. Esophageal adenocarcinoma, cancers of the colon and rectum, kidney cancer, pancreatic cancer, endometrial cancer, and breast cancer among postmenopausal women are associated with being overweight or obese. Several of these cancers also are associated with not being sufficiently physically active.

“This report demonstrates the value of cancer registry data in identifying the links among physical inactivity, obesity, and cancer,” said CDC Director Thomas R. Frieden, M.D. “It also provides an update of how we are progressing in the fight against cancer by identifying populations with unhealthy behaviors and high cancer rates that can benefit from targeted, lifesaving strategies, and interventions to improve lifestyle behaviors and support healthy environments.”

For more than 30 years, excess weight, insufficient physical activity, and an unhealthy diet have been second only to tobacco as preventable causes of disease and death in the United States. However, since the 1960s, tobacco use has declined by a third while obesity rates have doubled, significantly impacting the relative contributions of these factors to the disease burden. Excess weight and lack of sufficient physical activity have been linked to increased risk of cardiovascular disease, hypertension, diabetes, and arthritis, as well as many cancers.

“In the United States, 2 in 3 adults are overweight or obese and fewer than half get enough physical activity,” said John R. Seffrin, Ph.D., chief executive officer of the American Cancer Society. “Between children and youth, 1 in 3 is overweight or obese, and fewer than 1 in 4 high school students get recommended levels of physical activity. Obesity and physical inactivity are critical problems facing all states. For people who do not smoke, excess weight and lack of sufficient physical activity may be among the most important risk factors for cancer.”

The Report to the Nation was first issued in 1998. In addition to drops in overall cancer mortality and incidence, this year’s report also documents the second consecutive year of decreasing lung cancer mortality rates among women. Lung cancer death rates in men have been decreasing since the early 1990s.

Colorectal cancer incidence rates also decreased among men and women from 1999 through 2008. Breast cancer incidence rates among women declined from 1999 through 2004 and plateaued from 2004 through 2008. Incidence rates of some cancers, including pancreas, kidney, thyroid, liver, and melanoma, increased from 1999 through 2008.

“The continued declines in death rates for all cancers, as well as the overall drop in incidence, is powerful evidence that the nation’s investment in cancer research produces life-saving approaches to cancer prevention, screening, diagnosis, and treatment,” said NCI Director Harold E. Varmus, M.D. “But, it is also important to note that investments we make today are critical if we hope to see these declines in incidence and death from cancer reflected in future Reports to the Nation.”

Among children ages 19 years or younger, cancer incidence rates increased 0.6 percent per year from 2004 through 2008, continuing trends from 1992, while death rates decreased 1.3 percent per year during the same period. These patterns mirror longer-term trends.

Among racial and ethnic groups, the highest cancer incidence rates between 2004 and 2008 were among black men and white women. Cancer death rates from 2004 through 2008 were highest among black men and black women, but these groups showed the largest declines for the period between 1999 and 2008, compared with other racial groups. The differences in death rates by racial/ethnic group, sex, and cancer site may reflect differences in risk factors, as well as access to and use of screening and treatment.

“While the sustained decline in cancer mortality rates is good news, the persistence of disparities among racial and ethnic groups continues to concern us,” said Betsy A. Kohler, executive director of NAACCR. “The collection of comprehensive cancer surveillance data on all patients may provide clues to understanding these differences and addressing them.”

The report notes that continued progress against cancer in the United States will require individual and community efforts to promote healthy weight and sufficient physical activity among youth and adults.

Reference: Eheman C, Henley SJ, Ballard-Barbash R, Jacobs EJ, Schymura MJ, Noone AM, Pan L, Anderson, RN, Fulton JE, Kohler BA, Jemal A, Ward E, Plescia M, Ries LAG, Edwards BK. Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975–2008, Featuring Cancers Associated with Excess Weight and Lack of Sufficient Physical Activity. CANCER; Published Early Online: March 28, 2012.

To view the Report, go to http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1097-0142

http://www.cancer.gov/newscenter/pressreleases/2012/ReportNationRelease2012

— Last Edited by Greentea at 2012-03-29 08:47:02 —

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